Chord Construction Part 10: Stacking 3rd's

 

In the last lesson we learned:

1. that when two notes are "Two Whole-steps" away from each other we call them a Major 3rd (M3) away from each other.

2. that when two notes are "One and a Half Steps" away from each other, we can call them a Minor 3rd (m3) away from each other.

In the Interval Series we saw that Stacking 3rd's related to using every other note in the Major Scale to create chords and how to read some Chord Formulas.

In Part 9 of this Chord Building Series we started to see that every other note might either be Two Whole-steps away from the note we are on, or that it might be One and a Half Steps from the note we are on.

Let's look at this like "every other note of the Major Scale" as we did in the Interval Series:

C E G B D F A C

Now let's look at the distance (Interval Steps) between each note:

C            E            G            B            D            F            A            C
     2W        1 1/2       2W        1 1/2       1 1/2       2W         1 1/2

Let's take it one step further also relating it to "3rd's":

C            E            G            B            D            F            A            C
     2W        1 1/2       2W        1 1/2       1 1/2       2W         1 1/2
     M3           b3         M3          b3           b3         M3           b3

Now you should be able to see that counting every other note produces Major or Minor 3rd Intervals.

The downside is, it looked like it was just going to toggle between M3 m3 M3 m3 M3 m3 etc...but it didn't. No biggie. You'll see how it's all used shortly.

To recap: Stacking 3rds is...

1. to count/use every other note (or every third note) in the Major Scale when building chords.

2. how every other note in the Major Scale produces either a M3 or a b3 Interval.