Modal Chord Grips: Part 1

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This is a little study on ways to flesh out chord voicing's on the fly through Diatonic scales.

These are the triads in the key of Eb Major and of course all of them can be used over any Diatonic chord in the Key of Eb. 
When I say "on the fly" I guess I'm taking about even more about "random grabbing" of notes from the Diatonic scales, to use as chords.

I call them "grabbing's" or "tone clusters' "scale/chord fragments", but essential you can take ANY notes that are in the scale and play then simultaneously.

Doing this is nothing more than using random groups of notes, but staying within the correct "framework" of the Key.

When you do this within a Diatonic framework, you are essentially grabbing Harmonies within the Key that relate to any chord in the Key, Diatonically.

Like the F Dorian scale (which is the second Scale of the key of Eb)...look at it across the fretboard, but only on the 4 high strings...and you can form chords by simply 'grabbing' any of the notes...


F Dorian "grips" (or any scale of Eb Major)

E---3---4---6---8---10---11---13---15--
B---3---4---6---8---9----11---13---15--
G---1---3---5---7---8----10---12---13--
D---1---3---5---6---8----10---12---13--
A--------------------------------------
E--------------------------------------

Can you see that that was nothing more than basic random groupings of notes from F Dorian? Hopefully you can.

This is also a step into some jazz pianist "modal chord workings". These are common chords in the style of even some like Gil Evans.

Can you see that these are fragments of chords based on grabbing groups of notes out of a given scale?

Now look at this...

E---3--4--6--8--10--11--13--15--
B-------------------------------
G---1--3--5--7---8--10--12--13--
D-------------------------------
A-------------------------------
E-------------------------------

Those are fragments of the fragments :)

Here's some classic Bill Evans type comp'ing chords based on the exact same idea...

E-------------------------------
B---3--4--6--8--9--11---13--15--
G---1--3--5--7--8--10---12--13--
D---1--3--5--6--8--10---12--13--
A-------------------------------
E-------------------------------

Or here's another view...

E---3--4--6--8--10---11---13--15--
B---------------------------------
G---------------------------------
D---1--3--5--6--8----10---12--13--
A---------------------------------
E---------------------------------

Yet, another view...

E---3--4--6--8--10---11---13--15--
B---3--4--6--8--9----11---13--15--
G---------------------------------
D---1--3--5--6--8----10---12--13--
A---------------------------------
E---------------------------------

And one more....

E---3--4--6--8--10---11---13--15--
B---------------------------------
G---1--3--5--7--8----10---12--13--
D---1--3--5--6--8----10---12--13--
A---------------------------------
E---------------------------------

Now you can use your chord theory and see what each of these chords are from whichever Root within the Key of Eb Major.

And remember, I left out the A string and the Low E string. This was for no particular reason. So, start adding them in also. IOW, just start ""grabbing" random notes from the scale and see where things land, experiment with those given note.

It's good to have a thorough mental road map of the scales up and down the fretboard for sure. Looking at the scales as chords will help burn the "usable" notes into your brain too.

Hope that all made sense.

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