Phrygian Dominant Lessons 16-20

 

Lesson 16:

This is the very first thing I ever came up with, IOW when the sound of this scale first hit me. And, it's outside of the normal

positions we've been using so far. But, it's the same scale moved up around a D major bar chord at the 10th, 11th, and 12th frets.

I was doing a i-iv-V7 minor progression in Gm but using a D7 as the V chord (Gm-Cm-D7). This lick works prefect for changing the basic

modal minor sound to a more "nail that last chord" sound.

It also incorporates the D7 arpeggio and just one outside note which is from the scale. I played it by alternating picking every note,

but you sweep-pickers could probably make the strings melt on this one.

D__________________________________________
B__________10__11__13__11__10______________
G______11______________________11__________
D__12______________________________12______
A__________________________________________
D_______________________________________0__

Attached URL: Lesson #16

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Lesson 17:

This one is in the same area on the fret board as the last lesson. This is basically a D major arpeggio using a half-step note above each of the notes in the arpeggio. I'm sure quite a few of you actually already use this lick since it's also a pretty easy G Harmonic Minor lick. But, here we are using it in D major.

E_________________________________________________
B__________________10__11__10_____________________
G__________11__12______________12__11_____________
D__12__13______________________________13__12_____
A_________________________________________________
D______________________________________________0__

Attached URL: Lesson #17

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Lesson 18:

This is a couple four note patterns that can be played as sixteenth notes. The fingering should be pretty easy for most people.

The MP3 has it played one time slowly with just the notes, then slowly again with the strumming technique. Then fast with the strumming technique.


E__________________________________________
B__13_11_10_8____11_10_8_7____10_8_7_______
G_____________________________________8_7__
D__________________________________________
A__________________________________________
D__________________________________________

Attached URL: Lesson #18

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Lesson 19:

Alas, a little real diminished stuff.

If you've started to do any chord building with this scale you would've notice that there is a diminished chord found within the scales chords. And, since diminished chords are basically built from a symmetrical scale (consecutive whole/half steps or half/whole steps) the one chord you find could actually have 4 different names.

The chord can be built from either the 3rd, 5th, b7, or b9 from the scale. If you do consecutive m3 intervals starting on either of these notes you always end up back at the note you started on, except an octave higher. The same goes for moving down m3 intervals.

So in this scale we can have a F#dim, Adim, Cdim, or D#dim seventh chord. Even though there is four chords they a basically really one chord because they all contain the same notes. Experiment with the intervals and it will start shedding some light on things. Or, just ask me for more details on it. Myself and others (probably more so than I) can explain it further if need be.

But anyways, I kind of threw this MP3 together without really thinking what I was going to do. First it was just one arpeggio, then I moved into the other chords arpeggio's. Hence the sloppiness, and sounding like a "where the hell am I going" vibe.

The first part of the tab is kind of the main idea and uses sweep picking. It's play slow and fast.

Then, the next pieces are moving the idea across the fretboard and always ending with a resolve from the D# to the D chord. But, pay attention to those chords because they are in different spots for each movement and the last note of the sweep, before the resolving chords, can be different in each phrase based on the scale notes.


Played twice:
E_______________________________
B___________7_10_7______________
G________8__________8________7__
D__7_10________________10_7_____
A_______________________________
D_______________________________



Played twice:
E______________________________________
B___________7_10_7________________8_7__
G________8__________8________7____8_7__
D__7_10________________10_7_______8_7__
A______________________________________
D______________________________________


Played twice:
E__________________________________________
B___________10_13_10________________11_10__
G________11__________11________11___12_11__
D__10_13________________13_10_______13_12__
A__________________________________________
D__________________________________________


Played twice:
E____________________________________
B__________4_7_4________________4_3__
G_______5_________5_______5__________
D__4_7_______________7_4________5_4__
A____________________________________
D____________________________________


Played twice:
E___________________________________
B__________1_4_1_______________4_3__
G_______2_________2_______2____3_2__
D__1_4_______________4_1_______0_0__
A___________________________________
D___________________________________

Attached URL: Lesson #19

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Lesson 20:

 

This is nice little Indian sounding riff. Again, think of this with tabla's and violins in the background, and oh yeah bellydancers really shakin' those hips.

The MP3 has it playing the single notes slowly then the strumming technique slowly, and then the bellydances finale.

E________________________
B_________7______________
G__5_7_8_____8_7_5_7__7__
D________________________
A________________________
D________________________

Attached URL: Lesson #20